What is the pharmacologic action of SSRISs? How are SSRIs different from SNRIs?

What is the pharmacologic action of SSRISs? How are SSRIs different from SNRIs? Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are medications that block the binding site in the cells where serotonin attaches, increasing the free-floating amount of this natural component. The increased amount of serotonin promotes the control of people’s emotions and responses in different situations. It is thought that by blocking their binding sites, the amount of serotonin increases promoting the person’s ability to have self-control and more emotional stability (National Health Services, 2014). Some of the examples of this type of medications are: Prozac, Cipramil and Lustral. SSRIs and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are used in the treatment of behavioral problems like “GAD, panic disorder, PTSD, social phobia, and OCD” (Buttaro, Trybulski & Sandberg-Cook, 2013, p. 1349). SNRIs are a newer version of antidepressants that came out after SSRIs, which are very effective as well, but they work by blocking or slowing down the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine, two chemicals involved in mental processes and actions. Some examples of SNRIs are Effexor, Cymbalta and Pristiq (Buttaro, Trybulski & Sandberg-Cook, 2013). The first-line of treatment are SSRIs and then SNRIs. Click the button below to get a SPEEDY custom-written paper.

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